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Visiting someone in hospital – latest arrangements

We are reintroducing some limited visiting at our main and community hospitals in a safe and COVID-compliant way. This is in line with updated guidance from NHS England and the Government’s roadmap out of lockdown.

Visiting someone in hospital – latest arrangements main image

All visitors will be required to:

  • Wear the appropriate PPE and must not be experiencing symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Undertake the current risk assessment

We recommend anyone coming for an approved visit has a Covid lateral flow test prior to coming to the hospital. You can go to a local test site, collect tests to do yourself from a pharmacy or test site, or order them online. You can find your nearest site on the NHS England website or by calling 119.

From Monday 12 April our visiting arrangements are:

Adults

Critical Care, Coronary Care, Higher Care bay on Wellington Ward, Phoenix Ward, and the PICU on Harvest Ward

One identified visitor per day by prior arrangement with the Ward Leader (this must be one of two identified people)

A person receiving end of life care, regardless of their Covid status

The number of visitors will be limited to 3 close family members. This can be increased at the discretion of the Ward Leader to a maximum of 4 (from within the social bubble).

One visitor will be allowed for one hour, but more than one visitor can attend within a 24-hour period.

A person receiving longer term care, eg Garner Ward and Marie Therese House

Limited to one close family contact or somebody important to the patient.

Visiting times will be staggered to accommodate visiting for other patients.

Where possible, visits will be accommodated outdoors.

Visitors will need to be tested for Covid-19 using a lateral flow test.

Exceptional circumstances

These will be referred by the Ward Leader for approval by a member of the Care Group Triumvirate / Senior Leadership Team and approved by one member of the Executive Triumvirate or out of hours Executive on Call.

Paediatrics

One parent at any time and both parents to be present in the event of a critically ill child.

Maternity Services

Pregnant women and people can have one support partner with them at:

  • Early pregnancy unit appointments
  • ALL maternity scan appointments including growth scans
  • ALL antenatal clinic appointments (Community and hospital)
  • ALL Community Postnatal appointments
  • Day assessment visits
  • Throughout labour in Delivery suite and birth centres
  • Subject to individual approval, between 2-5pm every day on Wheal Rose and Wheal Fortune wards

To ensure everyone can stay safe;

  • All partners are asked to wear a mask at appointments and while moving around the building (unless exempt)
  • We ask that partners have a Covid lateral flow test prior to visiting on the wards. You can go to a local test site, collect tests from a pharmacy or test site, or order them online. You can find your nearest site on the NHS England website or by calling 119.
  • We will open windows to allow for extra ventilation during visiting times, please ask a staff member for extra blankets for yourself or your baby if required.
  • Partners may be asked to wait outside especially in settings with limited waiting room.
  • Please follow the guidance given by staff on the day of your appointment. The guidance will differ slightly depending on where you are having your appointment.

You must not visit if you have any of these symptoms:

  • New continuous cough
  • High temperature
  • Changes to your sense of taste or smell

If you do, you must say at home and go online or call 119 to arrange a Covid-19 test.

Many patients with smartphones and mobile devices are keeping in touch using our free hospital wifi. However, we know that not all patients have this technology and we are helping them to keep touch with trust devices, telephone and other messaging options.

At the Royal Cornwall, West Cornwall and St Michael’s hospitals there is also a Staying Connected service where family members and close friends can send a message or photograph through volunteer patient ambassadors. They can email rcht.covidstayconnected@nhs.net leaving the patient’s name, date of birth and the name of the ward they are on (if known), together with the message they want to send, or they can call 01872 253793 and we will call them back.

For community hospitals family and friends can contact the Patient Advice and Liaison Service team by calling 01208 834620 or by emailing cpn-tr.Palscft@nhs.net.

We will continue to review our visiting policy on a regular basis throughout the pandemic and will do everything we can to help patients and families keep in touch.

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Our new interim chief executive

We are delighted to have appointed Dr Matthew Patrick as our interim chief executive.

             Dr Mathew Patrick main text page

Matthew, a psychiatrist moved to south east Cornwall with his wife, who has close family in Cornwall.

Since his relocation in 2019, he’s been helping the Trust on a voluntary basis, with its pandemic planning. Most recently he’s been helping the south east Cornwall primary care network to deliver the COVID-19 vaccine.

Matthew whose NHS career spans 36 years has 15 years of board level leadership which includes 12 years as a chief executive at Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust and prior to his retirement, at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust.

Matthew will remain at the Trust for few months, while we recruit a substantive chief executive.

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Support for residents as shielding stops

Clinically extremely vulnerable residents are being reminded that wellbeing and mental health support is available to help them get back out into the community as the government advises that they can stop shielding from tomorrow (April 1).

Those coming out of shielding should follow the current rules under the government’s roadmap for lifting lockdown restrictions, but they should take extra precautions to protect themselves from Covid-19.

Key points for people stopping shielding are:

  • Minimise social interactions and try to reduce the amount of time spent in settings where social distancing is not possible.
  • Work from home if possible but those who cannot work from home should attend their workplace. Employers are required to take steps to reduce the risk of exposure to the virus in the workplace and should explain measures they have put in place to keep employees safe at work. From April 1 those previously shielding will no longer be eligible for Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) or Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) on the basis of being advised to shield. They may be eligible for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (furlough) or Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS), both of which have been extended until September 30.
  • Clinically extremely vulnerable pupils and students should return to their school or other educational settings.
  • All clinically extremely vulnerable adults should have had their first dose of the vaccine and are advised to take up the second dose when offered. If they have not had their first dose, they should contact their GP.
  • Age UK Cornwall and Volunteer Cornwall can help transport vulnerable residents who do not have their own transportation to their vaccination appointment.
  • Supermarkets will continue to provide priority delivery slots to vulnerable individuals until June 21. If residents need help getting online, for example to register for an online supermarket account, they can ring Cornwall Council’s support line for those who are clinically extremely vulnerable on 0300 1233334 or contact  Volunteer Cornwall.
  • Health services remain available and residents with a medical need or question should contact their GP or health consultant.

Cornwall Council is working with partners in the health and voluntary sector to continue to support vulnerable residents in accessing priority supermarket deliveries and signposting to wellbeing advice.

Emergency food support is available at foodbanks throughout Cornwall. An interactive Help with Food map has been created in partnership with community organisations and is online at Let’s Talk Cornwall.

Lets Talk Cornwall website

Cornwall Council is supporting Age UK Cornwall on a free, Step into Wellness coaching programme designed to provide lifestyle and mental health advice and to support people in getting back into the community.

Further information can be found at Cornwall Link

Step into Wellness – Cornwall Link

To register your interest email stepintowellness@ageukcornwall.org.uk or telephone 01872 266383.

There is general advice and guidance on improving mental wellbeing on Cornwall Council’s mental health pages.

Mental Health

Anyone who may be worried about their own or someone else’s mental health can contact 0800 038 5300 for help and support.

Rachel Wigglesworth, Cornwall Council’s director of public health, said: “We know that shielding has not been easy and we would like to thank everyone who has been shielding and their families, friends and other support networks for their efforts during this challenging time.

“Although clinically extremely vulnerable people will no longer be advised to shield from this Thursday, we still recommend that you take extra precautions to protect yourself while the virus is still circulating in our communities.

“These uncertain times mean we are all living and working in unusual ways and this can create feelings of stress and anxiety. If you’ve been shielding from others these feelings can be all the more heightened. But together with our health and voluntary partners there are things we can support you with to help maintain and protect your mental wellbeing.”

Ian Jones, Chief Executive of Volunteer Cornwall, said: “It has been a very difficult and worrying twelve months particularly for those who have been shielding. However, Cornwall’s communities and volunteers have been there to help to ensure people receive the support the need. Now with the backing from Cornwall Council we will continue our assistance to ensure any worries or concerns are addressed to enable people to have the confidence to reconnect with their community.”

Guidance for those who are clinically extremely vulnerable to COVID-19

  • For more information or advice on shielding contact  Cornwall Council on covid19@cornwall.gov.uk or call 0300 1233334
  • You can also contact Volunteer Cornwall on 01872 266988 or email requestforhelp@volunteercornwall.org.uk

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Cornwall reaches significant milestone with COVID vaccine

Philip Craddoc receives covid-19 vaccination at Royal Cornwall Showground

Lifesaving COVID-19 vaccinations have been administered to over a quarter of a million people in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly.

Since the first vaccine was given on Wednesday 9 December, health and care partners have been working around the clock to reach this monumental moment.

The roll-out of the vaccine is continuing to ramp up this week as the large-scale vaccination centres at The Royal Cornwall Showground and Stithians Showground administer the vaccine to up to 2,500 people a day. 

Philip Craddoc, 57, was among the thousands to receive his vaccine this week at The Royal Cornwall Showground and he said he didn’t feel a thing after having the vaccine.

“It feels great to have finally had the vaccine,” Mr Craddoc commented. “Having the vaccine is better for the whole country, and it means we can get back to some sort of normal.”

The military and St John Ambulance staff have joined the vaccinators and volunteers to help keep even more people protected from the deadly virus. Lance Bombardier, Luke Thompson from 47 Regiment Royal Artillery, was the one who vaccinated Mr Craddoc.

“Helping to vaccinate people has been really enjoyable so far,” Luke said. “It’s my job to help people, and having previously supported test sites, I knew I wanted to help with vaccinating. It’s all really well organised and everyone has been fantastic.”

Iain Davidson, clinical lead for the vaccination centres at Stithians and The Royal Cornwall Showground, and chief pharmacist at Royal Cornwall Hospitals NHS Trust, said: “It has been a huge team effort to get to this point. It has been down to the countless hours and dedication of Cornwall’s incredible staff working across health and care, the emergency services and all the volunteers, that has meant we have now vaccinated over 250,000 people.

“We all want to return to a sense of normality, and the NHS across Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly is continuing to work hard to vaccinate our communities in line with the groups currently prioritised in the guidance from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation guidance, to achieve this for us all.

“We encourage everyone that is currently eligible, to book their vaccination appointment.”

People aged 50 and over, those who are clinically vulnerable, carers and frontline health workers, who have received a letter or text message can book an appointment through the national NHS booking service or by calling 119.

Where possible, people are being encouraged to get someone to drive them to their vaccination appointment to help minimise the waiting time. It will also be helpful to have your NHS number ready upon arriving, which can be found on the NHS website.

For more information on the COVID-19 vaccine rollout visit NHS Kernow’s dedicated COVID-19 vaccine page.

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Keep Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly in eggcellent health this Easter

Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly’s health and care staff are asking people to not drop their guard against the COVID virus and help keep everyone in eggcellent health this Easter.

The NHS is calling on everyone’s help ahead of the long bank holiday weekend (2 April to 5 April).

People who need urgent –but not emergency –medical care when their own GP surgery is not open, including during the bank holiday, and don’t think they can wait, should contact NHS 111 online or by phone, at any time day or night.

John Garman, GP and a member of NHS Kernow Clinical Commissioning Group Governing Body, said: “As we arrive at the first stage of the easing of lockdown, we must not let our guard down, coronavirus is still circulating and we must continue to do all we can to limit the spread of the deadly virus.

“The best way we can continue to protect ourselves, each other and the NHS is to know the right place to go if you need medical treatment.

“If people have a non-life-threatening illness, which they can’t manage themselves with over the counter medicines or a visit to the pharmacy, they should contact their own GP surgery as the first point of call.

“When your GP surgery is not open you should contact NHS 111 online or by phone.”

There are other simple steps that you can take to help you avoid needing to seek medical advice later such as making sure you have a supply of antihistamines and paracetamol in your medicine cabinet.

Anyone who requires a repeat prescription is asked to make sure their request is with their GP surgery or designated pharmacy by Friday 26 March at the latest.

By doing so you will provide GPs the time to generate and authorise your prescription in the busy run up to Easter at the same time as many GP-led primary care networks continue with the COVID vaccination roll-out. Pharmacies may also need more time to prepare your medication

Pharmacists across the county will be available during the bank holiday weekend and will be able to provide expert, confidential advice and over the counter remedies for minor injuries as well as coughs and colds.

Julia Sharland, from the minor injuries unit at Newquay Hospital, said: “The bank holiday is traditionally a time to relax and have fun but if you or a member of your family falls ill or has an accident, please use the right health service.

“When you need urgent – but not emergency care – and your own GP surgery is not open, please contact 111 who can direct you to the best service. We ask that you do not turn up at the minor injuries units or our urgent treatment centres without contacting 111 first.

“We must all continue to follow the government guidance, maintain distance and make sure we can keep people safe while COVID continues to circulate.”

Anyone with serious or life-threatening illnesses or injuries should dial 999.

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Pressure relieving scheme shortlisted for national award after delivering dramatic benefits

A team from Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust have been highly commended in this year’s British Journal of Nursing Awards.A team from Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust have been highly commended in this year’s British Journal of Nursing Awards.

PROMISE logo large

Led by Nicci Aylward-Wotton, the PROMISE project has been researching the treatment and prevention of pressure injuries in people’s homes, since 2016. In 2017 CPFT were awarded a Scaling Up Bid from the Health Foundation of £500,000. In Cornwall, approximately 200 people a month develop a pressure injury with 5 to 7 of these serious.

The creative use of pressure monitoring technology through the PROMISE project has delivered dramatic outcomes. It even enabled one person to sleep in their own bed for the first time in 30 years.

The project has improved recovery – allowing sores to heal more quickly, reduced costs as solutions are found quickly and so staff need to visit less. Most importantly it has improved patients’ lives and experiences of care.

The staff involved in the research have said, being involved has helped them to better understand their patients’ goals.

Despite the fact most pressure injuries develop at home, research has historically considered their treatment and management in hospital.

Nicci explains, “Pressure injuries affect the elderly, people who are frail or who have a disability and who, as a result spend a lot of time in one position.

“By placing a pressure mat under the person, we can see ‘hot spots’ and act to relieve the pressure.”

“The mats let us see how a person moves over hours or days. This means we can offer advice based on the person’s needs and lifestyle. The mats also allow us to see how different pressure relieving equipment works for each person so we can assess the benefits based on what they want.

“We didn’t expect it, but it’s changed the way we work. We now fit the equipment to the person, not the other way around.”

The custom-made mats used by Nicci and the team are the same ones used by Formula 1 to test the pressures experienced by drivers during a race.

An added benefit of the project is the way it’s enabled the person and their carer to understand how pressure can build up over time.

The mats create a visual map of pressure points across the body, displaying the results on an iPad. This allows a person and their carer to see how adjusting position can add or reduce pressure.

One carer said, “Once you understand what’s going on between the body, mattress and chair, it’s simple.”

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How to keep in touch with your loved ones this Mother’s Day

Mother’s Day is going to be different once again this year; with national restrictions on households mixing outside of established bubbles meaning families and loved ones will not be able to celebrate in the usual way.  In our hospitals, we know that visitors are an important part of the well-being of our patients and their families. Wherever possible, we will continue to support you to be with your loved ones in whatever way we can.

Mothers Day

With visiting still limited due to the COVID-19 Pandemic, we want to remind families and friends of the different ways they can keep in touch with their loved ones while in hospital.

At the Royal Cornwall, West Cornwall and St Michael’s hospitals there is also a Staying Connected service where family members and close friends can send a message or photograph through volunteer patient ambassadors.

They can email rcht.covidstayconnected@nhs.net leaving the patient’s name, date of birth and the name of the ward they are on (if known), together with the message they want to send, or they can call 01872 253793 and we will call them back.

For community hospitals family and friends can contact the Patient Advice and Liaison Service team by calling 01208 834620 or by emailing cpn-tr.Palscft@nhs.net.

"Special events like Mother's Day are a really difficult time to not be able to be with our loved ones", explains Kim O’Keeffe, Interim Joint Director of Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Professions for the Royal Cornwall Hospitals and Cornwall Partnership Foundation NHS Trusts. "Many families across the country will be unable to be together this year and we will be doing everything we can to support mums in hospital."

Kim added, "Many patients with smartphones and mobile devices are keeping in touch using our free hospital Wi-Fi. However, we know that not all patients have this technology and we are helping them to keep touch with trust devices, telephone and other messaging options."

The latest exceptions for visiting are as follows:

  • End of Life: all patients considered End of Life (COVID-19 positive or COVID-19 negative) one identified visitor per day with prior arrangement (of max two individuals);
  • Paediatrics and Maternity: one parent and one birthing partner. Both parents can visit at the same time on neonatal and transitional care and both parents can be present in the event of critically ill child. Partners can attend 12-week scan and 20-week scan and those where bad news may be expected;
  • Exceptional circumstances: these will be referred by the Ward Leader /Sister or Nurse In Charge for senior approval;
  • In all circumstances visiting must be by prior arrangement and follow the track and trace principles by obtaining visitor details, instruction on the wearing PPE and completion of a risk assessment that is signed by the visitor.

"We are currently reviewing our visiting policy to consider the governments four step approach to the lessening of lockdown restrictions and we remain committed to do everything we can to help patients and families keep in touch," said Kim. "We understand how difficult visiting restrictions may be, but we still need your support to help us minimise the impact of the virus and to keep our people safe, together. We want to ensure the continued health and safety of patients, visitors, those who use our services and our staff during this challenging time."

I would like to take this opportunity to say ‘Happy Mother’s Day to all’

 

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Maternal mental health - Cornwall and Isles of Scilly to become pilot site

New mothers will benefit from additional mental health support as Cornwall and Isles of Scilly have been chosen as 1 of 10 pilot sites in the UK to receive NHS England and NHS improvement investment, for the development and testing of maternal mental health services.

The announcement was made after a collaborative bid across the local maternity system led by Royal Cornwall Hospitals NHS Trust (RCHT) and Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust (CFT).

As a pilot site, the perinatal mental health team in Cornwall will lead the way​ in partnership with RCHT’s integrated women requiring extra nurturing team (WREN), in achieving the ambitions for maternal mental health laid out in the NHS long term plan.

The investment awarded will enable the team to strengthen their services and help more women experiencing moderate to complex mental health difficulties arising from, or related to the maternity experience. As a pilot site, development and learning from their cases will be followed closely to support a full roll out of perinatal mental health services across the UK by 2023/24.

Mandy Raywood is a specialist perinatal mental health service manager at CFT. Her team works with women who develop mental illness in the perinatal period and integrates maternity, reproductive health, and psychological teams, offering consultation, therapy and targeted interventions.

Mandy is excited to see the difference becoming a pilot site will make to services already established. 

“1 in 4 women experience mental health problems in pregnancy and during the 24 months after giving birth. The consequences of not accessing high quality perinatal mental health care in the early stages of pregnancy can result in extremely serious problems that have a huge impact on women, their babies and their families.

“We already have teams working together to support vulnerable women in the county, but we know there are some women we don’t have the resources to get to.

"As a pilot site we will be able to strengthen our workforce and track the efficiency of treatment plans. Ultimately this will create a better maternal mental health offering for women in Cornwall as well as the rest of the country.”

Mandy’s team has helped people like 36 year old Claire, whose children are now 3 and 4 years old. Claire was referred to the team having had a traumatic birth experience with her first child which led to an ongoing disability. She was overwhelmed with the responsibility of having a new baby, not only because of the practicalities of her physical injuries, but the impact of her own difficult childhood was being triggered by becoming a mother herself. Added to which, shortly after her first baby was born, she found out she was pregnant with her second. The shock of the situation she found herself in led her to feel unable to cope and she was suicidal. Claire says the team saved her.

“I was in a very dark place and was struggling to bond with my baby. The perinatal mental health team (which is part of Cornwall’s maternal mental health service) were able to suggest and provide specialist services to wrap around me in a personalised care plan. This helped to make me feel less of a failure and gave me the confidence to parent my children and to start the process of reducing the self-doubt.”

Claire was supported by a psychiatrist, occupational therapist and a psychologist, she said, “I have a great bond with my children now, we are a happy family and I know I am a good mum. That is all thanks to the team.”

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Shielding support for clinically extremely vulnerable residents

Cornwall Council, NHS Kernow and Volunteer Cornwall are reassuring all clinically extremely vulnerable residents that support is available as more people are asked to shield as part of new government guidelines.

Shielding support for new and existing clinically extremely vulnerable residents

The Department of Health and Social Care is writing to an additional 4,333 adults in Cornwall out of 1.7 million people across England who have been identified under a new scientific model as having multiple risk factors which make them more vulnerable to the effects of Covid-19.

Latest technology analyses a combination of risk factors based on medical records, including health and personal factors, such as age, ethnicity, BMI and deprivation levels, as well as certain medical conditions and treatments, to assess whether somebody may be more vulnerable than was previously understood.

Those newly identified by their doctors or consultants as being clinically extremely vulnerable will now be asked to stay at home as much as possible except to go outdoors for exercise or to attend health appointments in the same way as people who have been shielding throughout the current lockdown.

In addition, residents new to shielding who have not already been offered the Covid-19 vaccination will now be prioritised to receive a vaccine as part of the current vaccination cohorts.

Age UK and Volunteer Cornwall can help transport vulnerable residents who do not have their own transportation to their vaccination appointment.

Cornwall Council is working with partners in the health and voluntary sector to continue to support all clinically extremely vulnerable residents in accessing food, essential supplies and wellbeing advice during the lockdown.    

Sally Hawken, Cornwall’s Cabinet Member for Children, Wellbeing and Public Health, said: “If you have just been added to the shielding list you may be wondering why you have only now been identified as being especially vulnerable to Covid-19. Scientists now understand a lot more about how the virus affects people and new research commissioned by the Chief Medical Officer has recently enabled health professionals to identify people who may be at increased risk of becoming seriously unwell from Coronavirus, because of a combination of their individual characteristics and their underlying health conditions.

“Most importantly, this new research helps clinicians provide vaccination more quickly to those identified as clinically extremely vulnerable and ensure they can benefit from additional advice and support.”

Dr Iain Chorlton, GP and chairman of NHS Kernow Clinical Commissioning Group, said: “The clinically extremely vulnerable group includes those previously told to shield because of reduced immune systems, such as due to organ transplants, or those with specific cancers or severe respiratory conditions, such as cystic fibrosis, chronic kidney disease (stage 5), those undergoing dialysis, and adults with Down’s Syndrome, but it also takes into account a variety of factors including age, ethnicity, body mass index (BMI), other health conditions and also postcode.

“People who are within the clinically extremely vulnerable group will have received a letter previously or should expect one to arrive shortly.

“It is really important that when a person within the expanded clinically extremely vulnerable group is invited to book an appointment for their Covid-19 vaccination by their GP or through the national booking service that they do so and attend.”

Rob Rotchell, Cornwall’s Cabinet Member for Adults, said: “Whether you have been shielding before or have just been asked to start shielding, please be assured that together with NHS Kernow and Volunteer Cornwall we are continuing to support our vulnerable adults who have had their lives affected so seriously by the pandemic.  

“Please do get in touch with us if you need help with food, prescriptions or if you are feeling anxious and needing mental health support, and we will do all we can to help.”  

Ian Jones, Chief Executive of Volunteer Cornwall, said “One of the most heart-warming things about the last 12 months is the way that communities have reached out and thrown their arms around their most vulnerable members. People have shown they are willing to offer one of their most precious assets, their time, to help others in need and that gives me great hope for the future.”

All clinically extremely vulnerable residents have now been advised to stay at home until March 31. 

They have been asked to work from home if possible and if they cannot work from home, they should not attend work. They may be eligible for Statutory Sick Pay, Employment and Support Allowance, Universal Credit or furlough through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.  

Those shielding are also asked to avoid all non-essential travel – they should continue to travel to hospital and GP appointments unless told otherwise by their doctor. They are strongly advised not to go to any shops or to pharmacies.   

Those in the clinically extremely vulnerable group are eligible for free medicines delivery from community pharmacies during this period if friends and family are not able to collect prescriptions or medicines on their behalf. Prescriptions should continue to be ordered from the GP as normal, either electronically or via telephone.   

Supermarkets are continuing to provide priority delivery slots to vulnerable individuals and if residents need help getting online, for example to register for an online supermarket account, they can ring Cornwall Council’s support line for those who are clinically extremely vulnerable on 0300 1231118 or contact Volunteer Cornwall.    

Volunteer Cornwall can also help collect and deliver food shopping and medical prescriptions, as well as provide befriending support and volunteers who can help with other low level needs.

Emergency food support is available at foodbanks throughout Cornwall. An interactive Help with Food map has been created in partnership with community organisations and is online at Let’s Talk Cornwall https://letstalk.cornwall.gov.uk/help-with-food.  

Health services remain available and residents with a complex need or medical question should contact their GP or health consultant.    

Anyone who may be worried about their own or someone else's mental health can contact 0800 038 5300 for help and support.    

Here is the updated guidance for those who are clinically extremely vulnerable to COVID-19.   

For more information or advice on shielding contact Cornwall Council on covid19@cornwall.gov.uk or ring 0300 1231118.   

You can also contact Volunteer Cornwall on 01872 266988 or email requestforhelp@volunteercornwall.org.uk   

 

 

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Environment Secretary tours Cornish mass vaccination centre

MP for Camborne, Redruth and Hayle, George Eustice, virtually met with constituents and healthcare workers helping to save lives and protect the NHS as government nears vaccine milestone.

Environment Secretary George Eustice has experienced first-hand the outstanding work undertaken at one of Cornwall’s vaccination centres during a virtual visit to the centre at Stithians showground.

Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.

The Secretary of State took a virtual tour of the vaccination hub yesterday (Friday 12 February) as the Government remains on track to offer a vaccine to everyone in the UK in the first four priority groups by 15 February.

Mr Eustice met chief pharmacist Iain Davidson who briefed him on Cornwall’s vaccine roll out. He was also joined by Cornwall-based celebrity chef Rick Stein, who recently got the vaccination himself, to thank the NHS heroes spearheading this cross-country effort.

As of 11 February, first doses have been delivered in to 127,802 arms in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly, with locals Geoff Penhaligon and Rosemary Southwood also joining the tour – after both receiving their own vaccinations as part of the ongoing vaccine roll out.

The visit comes as the Government confirms that over 13 million people have now received their first vaccine dose, and through our world-leading vaccines delivery plan everyone in the first four priority groups will be offered a first vaccine by Monday (15 February).

All those eligible for a vaccination are urged to take them up, as we continue to vaccinate our way out of this deadly pandemic.

Environment Secretary George Eustice said:

“The vaccination site at Stithians Showground is playing a vital part in the rollout of the vaccine across Cornwall. It was a pleasure to virtually meet some of the local NHS staff and volunteers who have been working so hard to get the vaccine to priority groups across from across the county.

“Our priority is to protect the NHS and save lives, and I would urge anyone who is eligible for a vaccine to book an appointment and join the national effort to help us halt the spread of this virus.”

Cornish local and celebrity chef Rick Stein said:

“I can report a completely positive experience having my COVID-19 vaccination last week, made all the more memorable because ½ dozen of my closest friends of the same age as me where there at the same time, the first social experience I’ve had for weeks.

“I think the NHS have been amazing throughout this awful pandemic.”

Iain Davidson, chief pharmacist for Royal Cornwall Hospitals NHS Trust, said:

“Vaccinating people is our way out of this pandemic, and we’re making great strides in our vaccination programme to protect the most vulnerable people in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly against COVID-19.

“Everyone across health and care is committed to the rollout programme and is working very hard to offer the vaccines to the most vulnerable by the middle of February, and I would like to thank them for their tireless support. Up until 4 February, our incredible team of GPs, practice nurses, pharmacists and clinicians have vaccinated more than 103,000 people – including our frontline health and social care staff.

“I would encourage anyone who’s aged 70 and older, extremely clinically vulnerable, or one of our frontline health and care staff who isn’t yet booked in for a COVID vaccination to call 119 or visit nhs.uk to book their appointment – don’t wait for your letter, just pick up the phone, or book online now.”

People aged 70 and over in England should contact the NHS to arrange their vaccination through the online national booking service. If they cannot get online, they can also call 119 or contact their local GP practice.

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