Two New Queen’s Nurses for Cornwall

Two nurses in Cornwall have become the latest to be awarded the prestigious title of Queen’s Nurse.

Two New Queen’s Nurses for Cornwall

There are now over 35 Queen’s Nurses in the county who have demonstrated a high level of commitment to patient care and nursing practice.

Queen’s Nurses serve as leaders and role models in community nursing, delivering high-quality health care. The application and assessment process to become a Queen’s Nurse is rigorous and requires clear commitment to improving care for patients, their families and carers.

Aimee Emmett and Caryn Jory both work for Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust (CFT), with a combined 45 years’ experience in nursing. Aimee and Caryn will be travelling to London on Monday 25 June to attend a glittering ceremony and be presented with their title.

The title is not an award for past service, but indicates a commitment to high standards of patient care, learning and leadership.

Nurses who hold the title benefit from developmental workshops, bursaries, networking opportunities and a shared professional identity.

Caryn Jory, who is an Epilepsy Specialist Nurse and working within the Learning Disability Team at CFT, has been nursing for 33 years, “There are multiple reasons why I became a nurse” commented Caryn. “Mainly because it’s possible to have a wide and varied career. There are prospects for nurses that are exciting and interesting and I wanted a career which allowed me opportunities to grow and develop.”

In recent years Caryn has had a number of research studies into epilepsy published and has presented her findings on a broad-range of subjects, including seizure control; sudden unexpected death in epilepsy; emergency rescue training and patient focused approaches to drug administration in those with a learning disability and epilepsy. One particular research project of Caryn’s will soon be published by NHS England.

Additional to her role as a Specialist Nurse, Caryn has spoken at many national events, including the National EpilepSy Nurses Association (ESNA) Prescribing Day in 2017. “I believe that it’s important to take up opportunities to present at events and to take learning from a wider audience, so that we can work to improve the lives of people with a learning disability and epilepsy” commented Caryn. “It’s for this reason that I became involved with the South West Epilepsy Nurses group and was invited to join the executive committee of Epilepsy Specialist Nurses Association. Currently I’m also involved with ESNA, in arranging a two day national epilepsy conference.”

Even as a Specialist Nurse, over 50% of Caryn work still involves going into patient’s homes. “This enables me to identify unmet needs, understand any worries and anxieties that a patient, family member or carer may have, and to develop trusting relationships” added Caryn.
Aimee, who is the West Team Lead, and a Community Stroke Specialist and Gastrostomy Nurse, has worked as a nurse in the community setting for 12 years. After a brief encounter with motor mechanics, at 16, Aimee’s grandfather had a large, devastating stroke, which resulted in complete paralysis and inability to communicate. From visiting her grandfather in hospital, it soon became apparent to Aimee that she wanted to forge a career in care, with a special interest in stoke.

Alongside her day-to-day work, in recent years Aimee has worked on an atrial fibrillation (AF) project. The project looks to seek earlier detection and treatment of AF in stroke and transient ischemic attack patients in the community, and to reduce the number of subsequent stroke events. Aimee has also had an article published in the prestigious Nursing in Practice Journal; undertook training to enable her to mark nursing students work, and taught and developed a reference card for GPs and Out of Hours colleagues on gastrostomy troubleshooting.

“Nursing will never just be a job to me” commented Aimee. “I have a huge passion for nursing and I view each day as potential for a new learning experience. You never stop learning!”

Aimee added “becoming a Nurse requires constant dedication; it’s not easy but incomparably meaningful and rewarding. Not everybody in life is lucky enough to work in a field where they can make such a huge difference every single day.

Dr Crystal Oldman CBE, Chief Executive of the Queen’s Nursing Institute (QNI) said: ‘On behalf of the QNI I would like to congratulate both Aimee and Caryn and welcome them as a Queen’s Nurses. Queen’s Nurses serve as leaders and role models in community nursing, delivering high quality health care across the country. The application and assessment process to become a Queen’s Nurse is rigorous and requires clear commitment to improving care for patients, their families and carers. We look forward to working with Aimee and Caryn and all other new Queen’s Nurses who have received the title this year.’